More Seasons

(Pictured: the Four Seasons in the mid 1970s, with Frankie Valli in the middle.)

The Four Seasons had at least one Top 10 hit every year between 1962 and 1967, and some of those rank among the greatest hits of the rock ‘n’ roll era: “Sherry,” “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” “Walk Like a Man,” “Dawn,” “Rag Doll,” “Let’s Hang On,” and “Working My Way Back to You.” Frankie Valli launched a solo career during that stretch that included “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You.”

As fashions changed, the Seasons tried updating their sound to fit the more psychedelic times, but the hits didn’t come. In 1971, the group signed to Motown, where an album and several singles bombed. By early 1974, a new album was in the can but the label wouldn’t release it. After the Seasons’ contract with Motown was up, Valli tried to buy all of the masters the Seasons had cut for them, but could afford only one, “My Eyes Adored You.” He released it on the Private Stock label as a solo single at the end of the year, and it went to #1.

(Valli’s solo career would truck along nicely for the next few years. “Swearin’ to God” was a Top-10 hit in the summer of 1975, and “Our Day Will Come” made #11 that fall, but Valli’s biggest solo hit wouldn’t come until 1978 with “Grease.”)

After five years without an American hit single of any sort, the Four Seasons signed with Warner Brothers in 1975. Valli’s partner Bob Gaudio had retired from performing by that time, although he continued to write and produce. New members had joined the group, including Gerry Polci and Don Ciccone, who shared vocal duties with Valli. The Seasons been absent long enough that nostalgia had a chance to work some magic. And where their late-60s recordings had them sounding out of place, their mid-70s update put them right on the cutting edge of AM radio pop.

A new album, Who Loves You, produced three great singles. “Who Loves You” made it to #3 in November 1975. It evokes the old-school Four Seasons sound, although Valli sings only the verses and none of the high harmonies. The record features a disco break in the middle that sounds like it came from some other record, after which it careens back into the refrain like a car going around a curve at high speed on two wheels, one of the most exciting moments on record in the 70s. “December 1963 (Oh What a Night)” went to #1 in March 1976. “December 1963″ (with Polci on lead and Valli on the bridge) might be the last great AM radio record. It’s never sounded as good to me coming out of big stereo speakers as it did on a little transistor radio.

You know both “Who Loves You” and “December 1963” because both of them are still on the radio. But what about the third single?

“Silver Star” tries to be neither “Who Loves You” nor “December 1963,″ and it surely ain’t “Big Girls Don’t Cry” or “Let’s Hang On,” either. It’s the Four Seasons’ nod to singer/songwriter rock. You rarely heard an acoustic guitar on a Four Seasons hit, although you hear it here. French horn, too. It might have done better with a more obvious disco beat. Although it’s got plenty of drive, it rose only to #38 on the Hot 100 during this week in 1976. Edited down from an album version that ran over six minutes, “Silver Star” is as ambitious a single as the Four Seasons ever tried to make. And one that is unjustly forgotten.

(Rebooted from a 2007 post.)

One response

  1. “My Eyes..”, one of my top10 all-time records…wonderful bass drum sound,pounding out..never realized how many hits they had….

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