Chart 5: Inner Worlds

If you are sick and tired of my obsession with 1976, this post isn’t going to help any. In my defense, it comes from a different angle than the usual—it’s the survey from KCR, the college station at San Diego State University, dated March 1, 1976. It’s got a handful of the major hits of the moment: Frampton Comes Alive, A Night at the Opera, Bad Company’s Run With the Pack, David Bowie’s Station to Station, and Desire by Bob Dylan. Here are five other interesting entries from a list that’s divided between “daytime” and “nighttime,” although there’s plenty of overlap between ‘em:

1. (daytime)/8. (nighttime) How Dare You/10cc. This album comes between The Original Soundtrack (with “I’m Not in Love”) and Deceptive Bends (with “The Things We Do For Love”) without a big single, although “I’m Mandy Fly Me” and “Art for Art’s Sake” made the lower reaches of the Hot 100. Of all the quirky acts the 70s produced, 10cc is among the most underrated—prog rock with a sense of humor.

5. (nighttime) Maxophone/Maxophone. Chances are good that if you are able to name one Italian prog rock band, it’s PFM (Premiata Forneria Marconi). Now you can name two. Maxophone was a six-piece band made up of avant-garde classical musicians and rockers. They released their debut album in both Italian and English; the Italian version has been re-released in the CD era. You can listen to the whole dang thing here.

6. (daytime)/9. (nighttime) Paris/Paris. This is how Bob Welch spent his time between leaving Fleetwood Mac and launching his solo career, in a power trio with former members of Jethro Tull and the Nazz. They made two albums (the second with a different drummer), but the band would be defunct by the end of ’76. You can listen to all of Paris here.

6. (nighttime)/Inner Worlds/Mahavishnu Orchestra. No self-respecting album-rock radio station of the late 1970s would fail to play a bit of jazz fusion, although Allmusic.com notes in their biography of the Mahavishnu Orchestra that the band was considered a rock band in their prime. Compared to earlier albums, Inner Worlds was stripped down—no strings, no horns—and it was the last album John McLaughlin would make under the Mahavishnu Orchestra name until 1984. Stoners of 1976 would probably have dug “Miles Out,” on which McLaughlin creates various otherworldly noises with his guitar.

7. (nighttime) When an Old Cricketer Leaves the Crease/Roy Harper. You have heard Roy Harper sing, even if you don’t realize it—that’s him on Pink Floyd’s “Have a Cigar.” He’s also the inspiration for Led Zeppelin’s “Hats Off to Harper,” and is in general a lot better known and more influential in the UK than over here. When an Old Cricketer Leaves the Crease (one of the great album titles of the 1970s) was released in the UK, it was known as HQ. Harper’s band at the time included Bill Bruford of Yes and fabled session guitarist Chris Spedding, and the album includes guest shots by David Gilmour and John Paul Jones. The somber, stately title song is here.

It seems pretty clear that like many college radio stations then and now, KCR was Very Serious About the Music, and in a way you can only be when you’re 21 or 22.

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One response

  1. ….and punk rock lurked around the corner….

    With a list like this it’s easy to see why.

    One of my friends bought a stereo on the basis of the sales guy playing that Roy Harper album for his demonstration.

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